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A worker removes a shark's fins in Chenggong, Taiwan. These sharks were caught close to shore making it economically feasible to haul in the entire animal. Normally, sharks are caught far from shore and the finning is done at sea. The finless shark is tossed back where it sinks to the seabed and slowly drowns. It's estimated that 73 million sharks worldwide are required to keep up with the demand for shark fin soup, long considered a delicacy in Chinese culture where a bowl can cost upwards of US$100.

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CFI_20110115_dulan_7411.jpg
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©2011 Craig Ferguson
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Stories | Taiwan Fishing
A worker removes a shark's fins in Chenggong, Taiwan. These sharks were caught close to shore making it economically feasible to haul in the entire animal. Normally, sharks are caught far from shore and the finning is done at sea. The finless shark is tossed back where it sinks to the seabed and slowly drowns. It's estimated that 73 million sharks worldwide are required to keep up with the demand for shark fin soup, long considered a delicacy in Chinese culture where a bowl can cost upwards of US$100.